Fishing Mosquito Lagoon

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Charter Fishing Mosquito Lagoon

You can catch nice size Black Drum while fishing Mosquito Lagoon.

Can you imagine that fishing Mosquito Lagoon on our Orlando fishing charter can produce this kind of fish? When you hook into one of these giants you know, it’s going to be a good fight! 

As one the full-time Mosquito Lagoon fishing guides, I really would enjoy taking you out to experience a little of the life I live here on the water.  Since I was a young boy, I have caught black drum both inshore as well as on the nearshore waters around Florida’s east coast. This species is similar to its cousin, the red drum, but the black drum’s feeding habits are much less predatory as it’s often too lazy to chase baitfish unless it has an easy chance. Typically the black drum is more cumbersome and feeds on opportunities of dead crustacean and mollusk. They will bite on live crabs and shrimp and occasionally take live finfish if they’re feeling frisky. More often than not the black drum will not expend the energy to chase too far and fast.

All our lagoon systems on the east coast of Florida host black drum including the Indian, Banana and Mosquito Lagoons. Even while snook fishing Sebastian Inlet, I often see schools of black drum meandering through the shallow grass flats. November seems to be some of the best times to seek them out but anytime from fall through winter is good. The best way I fish for these drums are with dead or live baits, and they often take flies if presented well. Give me a call soon and let’s make a plan to catch some black drum. – Captain Richard

Remarks

High arched back; 10 to 14 pairs of chin barbels; gray or black colored body in adults; young have 4 to 6 vertical bars; has cobblestone-like teeth capable of crushing oysters; scales large.

INSHORE fish common to bays and lagoons; bottom dweller often found around oyster beds; also OFFSHORE near wrecks and beaches.

The largest member of the drum family spawns NEARSHORE in winter and early spring; feeds on oysters, mussels, crabs, shrimp and occasionally fish; longevity to 35 or more years.

Regulations

Not less than 14″ or more than 24″. Five per harvester per day. May possess 1 over 24″. Florida Black Drum Regulations

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